Monday, January 21, 2013

Goldfish Varieties & Standards

Please note, the following information is not original to me.  I am simply passing along information that has already been made public in other forms.  As you will probably notice, this is not an exhaustive list of all the goldfish varieties in existence.  It excludes such goldfish as tamasabas (a single tailed ryukin variety), chochokins (a butterfly tailed fantail/ryukin variety), shukin (a long tailed dorsal-less fish), wakin, jikin, and watanoi to name some.  But it provides a good overview of many of the more common varieties. 

Common Goldfish (Hibuna) 

“The common goldfish is classified as a single-tail fish, having a dorsal fin. The fish possess a “torpedo” shaped body, and is from twelve to twenty inches in length. Lengths of twelve to twenty inches occur for fish raised in a pond environment, with lengths of six to ten inches common for tank-raised fish.  The body shape of the fish, while similar in appearance to that of a carp, is not as deep as that of a carp, and hence, has a more streamlined appearance when viewed from the side. Common goldfish do not develop the thickness of body exhibited in koi just before the start of the dorsal fin, and commonly referred to as the “shoulder” area in koi. When viewed from the top, the goldfish has an aerodynamic appearance, with the front and rear of the fish tapering into a “torpedo” shape. The common goldfish possesses double pectoral and pelvic fins, a single anal and caudal fin. The general shape of the fish, combined with the relatively short fins, allow the goldfish to swim powerfully, and to elude capture quite well.  Common goldfish, while often thought of as red fish, come in a host of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow-brown, and black.  Scalation in common goldfish is limited to the metallic form.  Since the common goldfish is a relatively plain fish, when compared to some of the more exotic varieties, judging for these fish is very strict. The number one criteria in judging a fish is the overall appearance or “conformation” of the fish. The fish should be free of defects and disease, and should swim vertically through the water. Scalation should be regular and even, and scales should not be missing. Since this is a metallic fish, the sheen of the fish is important, and coloration takes on added significance and should be a deep uniform color, throughout. Fins should be in good shape, with the tail fin being about 3/8 the length of the fish. The dorsal should be carried erect, and should be about 1/4 to 3/8 the depth of the body. Paired pectoral and pelvic fins should be the same size, and should be full.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Common Goldfish”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Examples of Common Goldfish

Comet
“The Comet is a single-tail long-bodied goldfish, and is the fish most people think of when the word goldfish is mentioned to them. The fish possesses a streamlined body shape, and is from twelve to twenty inches in length. Comets are graceful fish, and swim easily through the water, making them a favorite form of pond fish for many people.  Lengths of twelve to twenty inches occur for fish raised in a pond environment, with lengths of six to ten inches common for tank-raised fish.  The comet comes in a variety of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow-brown, and black. If the comet appears in a calico coloring, it is classified as a long finned Shubunkin, rather than as a comet.  The identifying characteristic of this variety of goldfish is the long, flowing fins which occur in the dorsal, caudal, pectoral and ventral fins. The caudal fin is often the length of the body, and in well-developed specimens, may be double the length of the body. A large specimen with a twelve-plus inch body and tail of equal or greater length makes for an impressive sight. The tail, in addition to being long, should also possess a prominent forking, so that approximately 80% of the tail is forked in appearance.  In the best specimens, the tips of the tail are almost clear, which produces a beautiful effect against the background color of the fish and fins.  The dorsal fin should be carried erect, and should be as deep as the body, or slightly deeper. There is a single ventral fin, which should be consistent with the length of the remaining fins.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Comet”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Examples of Comet Goldfish

London Shubunkin  
(Known as the Common Shubunkin in the US)
“The Shubunkin is similar to the common goldfish, and is classified as a singletail fish, having a dorsal fin. The fish possess a “torpedo” shaped body, and is from twelve to twenty inches in length. Lengths of twelve to twenty inches occur for fish raised in a pond environment, with lengths of six to ten inches common for tank-raised fish.  The primary difference between the common goldfish and the Shubunkin is primarily the coloring.  As mentioned in the previous article, the common goldfish comes in a host of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow-brown, and black.  The Shubunkin goldfish is a calico fish, and can be nacreous or matte, meaning that the fish can have scattered scales (nacreous) or matte (having the appearance of no scales).  [This] drawing shows the London Shubunkin, which we would call a common Shubunkin in the States.  It possesses a body and tail shape similar to that of the common goldfish, as seen in the illustration.  Judging for these fish is similar to that of the common goldfish, but with added emphasis placed on coloration (since these are calico fish), and the tail fin. Theoretically, each of the three types of tail fin are judged similarly, although in practice, the “Bristol” type fish, if it possesses good finnage, and other characteristics are equal, will always be judged ahead of the other two varieties.  Since coloration is so important to this fish, it is important that three primary colors are shown on the fish. The first of these colors is black, which should appear on the body, as well as in streaks which appear on the fins. The second primary color that must appear on the fish is red. The red should be as deep as possible, with an intense vermillion color being preferred. The third primary color that must appear on the fish is blue, which should be as intense as possible. Shubunkins often have the most intense blue coloring of any goldfish, and the color is often so deep that it appears purple. Other colors are permissible on the fish, as long as these three primary colors are included.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Shubunkin”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
 

Examples of Shubunkin Goldfish

Japanese Shubunkin
“The Shubunkin is similar to the common goldfish, and is classified as a singletail fish, having a dorsal fin. The fish possess a “torpedo” shaped body, and is from twelve to twenty inches in length.  Lengths of twelve to twenty inches occur for fish raised in a pond environment, with lengths of six to ten inches common for tank-raised fish.   The primary difference between the common goldfish and the Shubunkin is primarily the coloring. As mentioned in the previous article the common goldfish comes in a host of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow-brown, and black. The Shubunkin goldfish is a calico fish, and can be nacreous or matte, meaning that the fish can have scattered scales (nacreous) or matte (having the appearance of no scales).  [This] line drawing is called the Japanese Shubunkin by Merlin, and possesses a body and tail shape similar to that of the comet.  Judging for these fish is similar to that of the common goldfish, but with added emphasis placed on coloration (since these are calico fish), and the tail fin.  Theoretically, each of the three types of tail fin are judged similarly, although in practice, the “Bristol” type fish, if it possesses good finnage, and other characteristics are equal, will always be judged ahead of the other two varieties.  Since coloration is so important to this fish, it is important that three primary colors are shown on the fish. The first of these colors is black, which should appear on the body, as well as in streaks which appear on the fins. The second primary color that must appear on the fish is red. The red should be as deep as possible, with an intense vermillion color being preferred. The third primary color that must appear on the fish is blue, which should be as intense as possible. Shubunkins often have the most intense blue coloring of any goldfish, and the color is often so deep that it appears purple. Other colors are permissible on the fish, as long as these three primary colors are included.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Shubunkin”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.


Bristol Shubunkin
“The Shubunkin is similar to the common goldfish, and is classified as a singletail fish, having a dorsal fin. The fish possess a “torpedo” shaped body, and is from twelve to twenty inches in length. Lengths of twelve to twenty inches occur for fish raised in a pond environment, with lengths of six to ten inches common for tank-raised fish.  The primary difference between the common goldfish and the Shubunkin is primarily the coloring.   As mentioned in the previous article the common goldfish comes in a host of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow-brown, and black.  The Shubunkin goldfish is a calico fish, and can be nacreous or matte, meaning that the fish can have scattered scales (nacreous) or matte (having the appearance of no scales).  The final form is the Bristol Shubunkin, which possesses the body shape of the common goldfish, but with a beautiful, flowing single tail.   Judging for these fish is similar to that of the common goldfish, but with added emphasis placed on coloration (since these are calico fish), and the tail fin. Theoretically, each of the three types of tail fin are judged similarly, although in practice, the “Bristol” type fish, if it possesses good finnage, and other characteristics are equal, will always be judged ahead of the other two varieties.  Since coloration is so important to this fish, it is important that three primary colors are shown on the fish. The first of these colors is black, which should appear on the body, as well as in streaks which appear on the fins. The second primary color that must appear on the fish is red. The red should be as deep as possible, with an intense vermillion color being preferred. The third primary color that must appear on the fish is blue, which should be as intense as possible. Shubunkins often have the most intense blue coloring of any goldfish, and the color is often so deep that it appears purple. Other colors are permissible on the fish, as long as these three primary colors are included.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Shubunkin”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Fantail
“The Fantail is a double-tail goldfish, which possesses an egg-shaped, rather deep body and paired anal, ventral and pectoral fins. The dorsal fin is large, and should be carried erect. The fantail was probably the first double-tailed fish bred successfully, and most likely developed as a natural mutation in China.  Fantails can grow quite large, with specimens of 10 -12 inches being reported. Despite the large size, and presence of paired fins, fantails swim quite well, and are very hardy. Fantails do well in a pond environment, and mix well with single-tail goldfish varieties.  The fantail comes in a variety of colors, including orange, yellow, white, olive or drab green, yellow brown, calico and black. The primary identifying characteristics of this variety of goldfish are the paired fins (especially the caudal or tail fin), the deep body, and the high erect dorsal, which is expected to be from 1/3 to 1/2 the depth of the body. Typically, the caudal fin should be from 1/4 to 1/2 the length of the body, split for at least 75% of the length of the tail, with the remaining fins being proportional to the shape and size of the fish.  Unsplit, or tripod tails are to be avoided, and will sometimes result in a disqualification at a show.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Fantail”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
Examples of Fantail Goldfish

Ryukin
“The Ryukin is a double-tail goldfish, which possesses an oval body shape, which is almost round, and paired anal, ventral and pectoral fins. The dorsal fin is usually 1/3 the depth of the body, and the caudal fin, which is forked, is from 3/4 to 1-1/2 times the length of the body. The distinguishing feature of this fish is the hump, which starts at the back of the head, and arches markedly until the start of the dorsal fin. The hump is composed of a combination of fat and muscle, and should extend symmetrically across the back of the fish. The head is often overlooked on Ryukins, but should appear triangular when viewed from the top of the fish.  Ryukins are large fish, both in terms of length and in terms of girth. Large Ryukins of ten to twelve inches are not uncommon, and are very eye-catching.  Despite their deep body shape, Ryukins do not appear to be as susceptible to swim bladder problems, as are many of the other deep bodied fish.  Ryukins swim in a somewhat awkward fashion, and appear to waddle through the water. This awkward swimming motion may be due to the combination of deep body, relatively long fins, and the hump.  The Ryukin comes in a variety of colors, including red, red and white, orange, white, olive or drab green, and calico.  Red, and red and white Ryukins seem to have an intense coloration, and these fish are truly spectacular, when large.  Recently all-black, metallic blue, and “Goshiki” (silver or gray with orange markings) have been introduced from the Far East. Another recent development is the importation of short-finned Ryukins (primarily from China), which have an even more round appearance, and drastically shortened fins. These fish are very popular in China, and are being seen more frequently in the States.  A diet containing more protein than normally fed to single-tail fish is often considered desirable for the development of the hump. In addition to higher protein content, live or frozen foods, such as earthworms, brine shrimp, daphnia, and blood –worms are ideal for bringing out the best in these fish.  Judging for these fish is somewhat different than for single-tail fish, since the tail and double fins present unique challenges (they should be matched and proportional to the size of the fish). In addition, particular attention should be paid to the body depth, the height of the dorsal fin, and of course, the development of the hump.  As mentioned above, the hump should be symmetrical, and full.  Care should be taken to ensure that the head, when viewed from above, is triangularly shaped, and that the mouth is well-formed.
It is important that the head not be pinched-looking, which can occur in this type of fish.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Ryukin”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
 
Examples of Ryukin Goldfish

Lionhead
“The Lionhead was the first dorsal-less fish produced with headgrowth. The most striking characteristic of the Lionhead is the prominent headgrowth, which can be divided into three areas: cranial growth, cheek growth and opercular, or gill growth.  Cranial growth refers to the development of the wen over the top of the fish’s head area. Cheek growth refers to the placement of the wen over the region surrounding the eye and extending into the cheek and frontal areas of the face.  Opercular growth refers to the area covering the gill plates of the fish. In the Lionhead, all three areas should be fully developed, and growth in one area should not predominate over the other areas.  The overall effect of the headgrowth should be balanced, so that the fish appears to have a rounded appearance, as shown in the line drawing.  The back profile of the fish should be almost flat, with a gentle slope towards the caudal peduncle, where the tail joins the body. There should be no trace of a vestigial dorsal spine, nor should there be any hint of an indentation where the dorsal fin would normally meet the body. When viewed from the top, the caudal peduncle appears to narrow where it joins the body and tail, but the fish should not show signs of a pinch near the peduncle region.  In some fish, the caudal peduncle appears to be rather long, which gives the fish an unbalanced look.  Finnage is paired for the pectorals, ventrals and anal fins, and the tail should show a fork. The amount of forking permitted in the tail is from twenty-five to seventy-five percent, but this should be evaluated by eye-site, and not by a strict attempt at measurement.  The degree of forking in the tail will determine the fish’s swimming motion. If the tail is forked at less than twenty-five percent, the fish will collapse its tail and swim with a lurching motion from side-to-side. If the tail is forked by more than seventy-five percent, the tail will spread out too greatly, causing the fish to sink while swimming.  A tail split of approximately fifty percent seems to produce the best swimming motion for the fish. The body shape of the fish should appear slightly rectangular, and not elongated.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Lionhead”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
 

Ranchu
“The Ranchu, like the Lionhead, is a dorsal-less fish which has headgrowth, or a wen. The Ranchu can be distinguished from the Lionhead, by possessing a more moderate headgrowth, and rounded, sloping distinct back and tail profile.  In addition, the body shape of the Ranchu appears less boxy-looking, and more rounded than that of the Lionhead.  Finally, while the headgrowth is less pronounced than that of a Lionhead, headgrowth on the Ranchu conforms to certain standards, developed by the Japanese, which give the Ranchu a distinct appearance.  As mentioned above, the headgrowth of the Ranchu is one of its primary characteristics and can be divided into three areas: cranial growth, cheek growth and opercular, or gill growth. Cranial growth refers to the development of the wen over the top of the fish’s head area. Cheek growth refers to the placement of the wen over the region surrounding the eye and extending into the cheek and frontal areas of the face.  Opercular growth refers to the area covering the gill plates of the fish.  All three areas of headgrowth should be fully developed in the Ranchu, and growth in one area should not predominate over the other areas.  In considering headgrowth in the Ranchu, the Japanese judge the fish from the top down. When looking down at the fish, imagine that the headgrowth forms a rectangular area.  The head should appear rectangular and should to fill the area inside the rectangle as completely as possible.  In addition to the headgrowth, the Ranchu has a unique back and tail profile.  Where the back of the Lionhead slopes slightly towards the caudal peduncle,  and is relatively flat, the back of the Ranchu slopes drastically downward in an arc, where it joins the caudal peduncle. The tail is upswept at a forty-five degree angle where it joins the peduncle. The caudal peduncle, that is, the area where the tail joins the body is very thick in order to support the sharp back curve and the angle at which the tail is joined to the body. This unique thickness of the caudal peduncle is a distinguishing characteristic of Ranchus, and can be used as one of the methods of distinguishing between Lionheads and Ranchus.  Finnage is paired for the pectorals, ventrals and anal fins, and the tail should show a fork. The amount of forking permitted in the tail is from twenty-five to seventy-five percent, but this should be evaluated by eye-site, and not by a strict attempt at measurement. The degree of forking in the tail will determine the fish’s swimming motion. If the tail is forked at less than twenty-five percent, the fish will collapse its tail and swim with a lurching motion from side-to-side. If the tail is forked by more than seventy-five percent, the tail will spread out too greatly, causing the fish to sink while swimming.  A tail split of approximately fifty percent seems to produce the best swimming motion for the fish.  Please note that the finnage for the Ranchu is more rounded at the edges than that of the Lionhead, which can appear pointed at the edges of the fin.  The body shape of the fish should appear rounded and full, not elongated. The Ranchu is available in all colors seen in goldfish, and although calico varieties are very rare, a strain of calico Ranchus called Edonishiki, is known.
In practice, most Ranchus are red, red and white, and black with other colors being uncommon. Ranchus can grow to lengths of eight to ten inches, although they are generally seen in the five to six inch size for mature specimens.  When judging Ranchu preference is given to fish with full hood development, emphasizing the rectangular appearance of the hood and the curvature of the back, thickness of the caudal peduncle, and angle of the tail as it connects to the body.  Recently, Lionheads have been crossed with Japanese Ranchu to produce a fish with the back profile of a Ranchu, with the hood growth of a Lionhead. These fish are not a recognized breed, but have been winning major awards at competitions in the United States. The term “Lionchu” has been coined to describe these fish, and they are becoming more popular at fish shows across the country.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Ranchu”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
Examples of Ranchu Goldfish

Oranda
“The Oranda comes in a variety of body styles and exhibits a wide range of variation in fin length and style. Due to the variations in body shape, finnage, and head-growth characteristics, Orandas are difficult to judge and purchase. One thing that all types of Orandas have in common is the ability to reach large sizes. It is not unusual to see Orandas that range in size from eight to twelve inches, and with fins that add several inches to the body size. We’ll attempt to describe the body, finnage, and head-growth characteristics often seen in these fish.  There are two predominant body styles seen in Orandas. The first type of body style tends to be more rounded, and looks egg-shaped.  The second body type tends to be more streamlined, and less robust.  Generally speaking, the more rounded body shape is preferred, since it provides a better structure for the placement of fins, and permits the fish to balance the wen or head-growth, which can become quite heavy as the fish matures.  Finnage on Orandas can be quite variable, ranging from a thin style of fin (which is also known as ribbon-tail, forked, or basic double tail), to a fuller style of fin, which looks similar to a Veiltail.  There are also versions of Orandas which have tail styles that are intermediate between a true ribbontail and a Veiltail.  Dorsal fins seem to be linked to tail type. The ribbon-tail varieties seem to possess less well-developed dorsal fins, while the Veiltail types seem to produce dorsal fins that are higher and carried more fully erect. Body style also seems to be linked to finnage.  Generally speaking, the fuller body types seem to have better developed fins, while the thinner body types tend to have less well-developed fins. Longer, more flowing fins are preferred, and tend to be rated more highly when judging these fish.  Headgrowth in Orandas can be quite variable, and there are three areas where headgrowth occurs in these fish. The first area of growth is in the cranial region, that is, on the top of the head. The second area of growth is on the checks of the fish, and the third area of growth is on the gill plates. Ideally, the fish should have evenly distributed headgrowth over all three areas of the fish. It is often common for Orandas to have headgrowth in one or two of these areas, or to have uneven headgrowth in any of the areas. Fish with uneven headgrowth should be avoided.  Orandas occur in all colors common to goldfish. Several specific types of coloration have been developed in Orandas, including a Redcap which is a white fish with a red headgrowth, and the Azumanishiki, which is a Japanese term for a Calico Oranda.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Oranda”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Examples of Oranda Goldfish

Telescope
“The Telescope eye is a fish with a round body, paired fins, and protuberant eyes. The body shape is closer to that of an Oranda than that of a Ryukin, in other words, it is a rounded, not a round shape.  The finnage is paired and tends to be moderately long, although in some strains, the fins appear extremely long, especially the dorsal and caudal fin.  In these longer-finned fish, the caudal fin shows little or no forking and appears square-cut.  The eyes are the characteristic feature of this fish, and should be matched, as well as being protuberant. When we speak of matched eyes, we are actually talking about two aspects of the eyes. The first aspect is that of size; in other words, the eyes should be of the same size and type. An example of a problem relating to eye size would be that of a fish with one eye that is significantly larger than the other. The second aspect of eye type is that of placement on the head of the fish.  Both eyes should be placed symmetrically on the head.  If one eye is placed significantly forward or backward of the other, or if one eye is placed upward or downwards on the head, when looked at in relation to the other eye, this is a problem.  There are actually several types of eye types which are permissible: a segmented type, where the eye appears to be composed of a series of concentric circles, which gradually get smaller; a conical type, where the eyes are cone-shaped looking almost like a volcano; and a rounded, protuberant type, which appear to form a small balloon attached to the cheek, and which is pictured on the line art drawing.  Of these three eye types, the segmented and balloon-type are the most elegant, and are the preferred type.  Please note that mixing of eye types on a single fish is undesirable: as an example, one eye should not be round and the other segmented.  The Telescope is not a very large goldfish, and is usually six to seven inches in size, excluding the tail. Larger individual fish are seen, but they do not occur with the regularity seen of Ryukins or Orandas. The Telescope comes in a variety of color and scalation types including metallic, matte and nacreous, and along with the Oranda is perhaps the most diverse of the goldfish.  Despite the strange appearance of the eyes, the Telescope is a hardy fish, and can be kept in a mixed tank of goldfish, although it is probably best not to keep them with single tails, since they will have a difficult time competing for food.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Telescope”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Examples of Telescope Goldfish

Pearlscale
“The distinguishing characteristic of this fish is the raised scale, which gives the appearance of a pearl, hence the name.  As you can see from the line art drawing, the Pearlscale possesses a stout, rounded body, smallish dorsal fin, and double pectoral, anal, and caudal fins. The body of the fish is among the most rounded, and therefore, compact of any of the goldfish varieties. In some instances, the body is so rounded as to appear to be ball-shaped. The compact body shape makes these fish extremely susceptible to swim bladder problems.  The caudal fin of these fish is usually well-developed, which, when combined with the round body, gives these fish an unusual swimming motion, and makes them look as if they were waddling in the water.  As mentioned earlier, the scaling is the characteristic feature of this fish. The scales should be raised, with a bump or excrescence appearing on each individual scale. These excrescences are made up of the same material as regular scales, and can be damaged or knocked-off. Scales, once removed, may or may not grow back with the raised protuberance at the base of each scale. In order to be competitive in a judging environment, the scaling should be observed on each individual scale of the fish, without the fish having missing scales. It is important that the scales continue from the belly, through the sides and onto the back area of the fish, right up to the dorsal fin.  The Pearlscale comes in a variety of color and scalation types (other than the pearling) including metallic, matte and nacreous.  A variation of the Pearlscale that has a head-growth is known as the Hamanishiki, or Pearl-Scaled Oranda. These fish have the basic body-shape and pearling associated with a regular Pearlscale, along with a wen-growth, like the Oranda goldfish.  Sometimes, rather than having one wen, the Hamanishiki can have two wens on top of the head.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Pearlscale”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
 

Example 1 and Example 2 of Pearlscale Goldfish

Veiltail
“The Veiltail is a round bodied fish, and possesses paired anal, ventral and pectoral fins. The dorsal fin is usually 3/4 or more of the depth of the body and should be carried fully erect, and the caudal fin, which in the best specimens is completely straight, is often the length of the body to 2 times the length of the body. The distinguishing feature of this fish is the finnage, and to see one of these fish in person is truly a remarkable sight. The fins literally flow around the fish as they swim, giving the impression that the fish is gliding in the water. The body, as was mentioned is round, and should look almost like a ball, and be very compact.  Veiltails are relatively smaller fish when compared with Orandas and Ryukins. Body sizes of 5 to 6 inches are about the maximum limit for these fish, but with caudal fins as large as 2 times the size of the body, these fish can look larger than they actually are.  Most Veiltails come in metallic coloration with red, orange and blue-silver colors being the most common.  The primary feature of these fish is their finnage, and judging should reflect proper fin development and carriage at rest and in motion. The body shape should be round, and elongated body shapes are not viewed favorably during judging.  Colors are usually limited to orange, red, blue-grey and matte calico.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Veiltail”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.
Examples of Veiltail Goldfish

Bubble Eye
“The bubble eye was developed from Egg-fish stock, although the eye growth was probably the result of mutation. The original bubble eye probably resembled a toad head (which has small fluid-filled sacks just underneath the eyes), which gradually enlarged to form the bubbles that are familiar to hobbyists today.  Long bodied bubble eyes were common in the seventies and eighties, but have been replaced in the last twenty years with a stouter-bodied fish.  When showing fish, you should look for a slightly rounded back profile, and the back should be free from dorsal appendages or protuberances. The fins should be long and flowing, and all fins should be double.  The fluid filled sacks should be the same size, and not too large.  Bubble eyes come in all three scale types: metallic, nacreous and matte, although the metallic scalation is most frequently seen. These fish are also available in all colors common to goldfish, although once again, orange to orange-red is most common. Calico varieties of these fish are rare, and when seen, are striking.  Since these fish have unique eyes and lack of a dorsal fin, swimming can be problematic.  These fish should be kept with other fish of their variety.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Bubble-eyes and Celestials”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Celestial
“The celestial actually has a more robust body shape than the bubble eye, along with longer, more flowing fins. The shape of the celestial closely resembles that of an Egg-fish, with an oval shaped body, and slightly curving back profile.  When showing fish, you should look for a slightly rounded back profile, and the back should be free from dorsal appendages or protuberances. The fins should be long and flowing, and all fins should be double. In the case of the celestial, the eyes should be pointed upward, and many fish appear to be slightly cross-eyed.  The eye sockets should be matched in size and type. The celestial can have the same types of eye sockets as the telescope goldfish, but the oval types are seen in the vast majority of cases.  It is interesting to note that in China, there is a form of celestial which retains a dorsal fin.  Celestials come in all three scale types: metallic, nacreous and matte, although the metallic scalation is most frequently seen. These fish are also available in all colors common to goldfish, although once again, orange to orange-red is most common. Calico varieties of these fish are rare, and when seen, are striking.  Since these fish have unique eyes and lack of a dorsal fin, swimming can be problematic. These fish should be kept with other fish of their variety.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Bubble-eyes and Celestials”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

Nymph
“The Nymph is often viewed as a cull of the Veiltail or Ryukin. It is a single tail fish that has the body-shape of either the Veiltail or Ryukin, but is identical in all other respects to these fish. In the early part of the twentieth century, Nymphs were sought out and won many awards at top goldfish shows throughout the country. Today, they are rarely seen, and as mentioned earlier are viewed as culls of the more desirable double-tail fish. The original Philadelphia standards listed the Nymph as a separate variety of goldfish, and had point standards for this fish. Today, these fish are rarely seen, and a good specimen would probably do well in competition.”
Reference: “Goldfish Varieties – Odds & Ends”, Goldfish Society of America (GFSA), Peter Ponzio.

11 comments:

  1. I've always thought of Celestials and Bubble Eyes to be a cruel breed created by humans... they don't seem to have a great quality of life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ALL goldfish types are created by humans (aka non wild types). Yes they may have originated by natural mutation but it has been human domestication and selective breeding that created all the types we have available today.
      However, I do understand how you mean but they are not unlike Black Moors and those are believed to have been "developed in China in the early 1700's" which to my understanding would mean that a NATURAL: mutation occurred and was then selectively bred to retain these traits. We could argue whether any of the types would have become so wide spread as they are today without human intervention ('helping hand') or would they still have developed but at a much slower and perhaps more varied. Same can be said for any domesticated animal/plant and becomes a philosophical and ethical question with no exact answer. Would many of the interesting types (plant and animal) have survived naturally or developed differently in the long term.....
      'quality of life' is also a perception, who is deciding what is 'quality' whether it is for animal, plant or human? Example, does a Koala have quality of life? (given they sleep for about 22 hours out of 24, is this 'quality'). My point being that I do understand yet do not agree that it could be labeled as 'cruel', lacking 'quality of life' or to specifically point to those two types as being 'created by human' (pretty damn sure there were no DNA splicing going on in the 1700's!! It was a NATURAL mutation that humans simple assisted and developed)

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    2. ALL goldfish types are created by humans (aka non wild types). Yes they may have originated by natural mutation but it has been human domestication and selective breeding that created all the types we have available today.
      However, I do understand how you mean but they are not unlike Black Moors and those are believed to have been "developed in China in the early 1700's" which to my understanding would mean that a NATURAL: mutation occurred and was then selectively bred to retain these traits. We could argue whether any of the types would have become so wide spread as they are today without human intervention ('helping hand') or would they still have developed but at a much slower and perhaps more varied. Same can be said for any domesticated animal/plant and becomes a philosophical and ethical question with no exact answer. Would many of the interesting types (plant and animal) have survived naturally or developed differently in the long term.....
      'quality of life' is also a perception, who is deciding what is 'quality' whether it is for animal, plant or human? Example, does a Koala have quality of life? (given they sleep for about 22 hours out of 24, is this 'quality'). My point being that I do understand yet do not agree that it could be labeled as 'cruel', lacking 'quality of life' or to specifically point to those two types as being 'created by human' (pretty damn sure there were no DNA splicing going on in the 1700's!! It was a NATURAL mutation that humans simple assisted and developed)

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  2. Jennie! I'm a huge fan!!!, u think a 20 gallon is fair enough for 3 baby orandas? I mean, very tiny ones, at least during 3 or 4 months?

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    1. Hi there. I'd encourage you read the first blog post in the goldfish 101 page. The golden rule is: 20 gallons per fancy (double tail) fish and 40 gallons per single tailed fish. that means that a 20 gallon tank would perfectly serve an oranda for its entire life. I'd recommend you buy two females and a male and keep them in a 20 gallon tank for maximum a year. When it comes to mating season you should buy a larger tank, put one of the females in the larger tank and breed the other two in the 20 gallon tank. The solid gold YouTube channel has a lot of information on how to breed fish. It is way easier then you think and it's really fun. If you don't want to breed them then buy all females or all males. Hope I helped (:

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  3. Best singe page write up ever.... good work! The illustrations are the best I ever saw, and wherever they were sourced, have an authenticity and clarity we goldfish lovers are hard put to find elsewhere on the internet. kudos...

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  4. Any suggestions on standards for shukin?

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    1. 40 gallons will serve a shubunkin for his entire life perfectly. I recommend you buy an 80 gallon tank and buy two fish. Shubunkins get along with others really well. If you're going to buy someone other then a shubunkin, then only buy a single tailed fish. Feed them a little bit but spread throughout the day. When changing water, take out only 2/3 of the water, add all the chemicals (ask an aquarium shop for them) and then fill it up with fresh water that closely resembles the temperature of the water that is already in the tank. Good luck!

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  5. i agree, some of these deformed goldfish should not be bred at all.

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  6. i agree, some of these deformed goldfish should not be bred at all.

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    1. I don't mean to be rude but all of you are wrong. All of the goldfish have the same genus and species so you can basically bread any single tail with any single tail and any double tail with any double tail.

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